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Size has been one of the most interesting aspects of dinosaur science to the general public. This article lists the largest and smallest dinosaurs from various groups, sorted in order of weight and length. Note: this list excludes unpublished material. In some cases, dinosaurs are known that will be included on this list if/when they are officially described.

Theropods

Size estimates taken primarily from [1], [2], and dal Sasso et al., 2006.

Longest Theropods

Size by overall length, including tail, of all theropods over 12 meters.

  1. Spinosaurus: 16-?21 m (53-?69 ft)
  2. Giganotosaurus: 13.5 m (44.2 ft)
  3. Tyrannotitan: ?13.4 m (?44 ft)
  4. Deltadromeus: 13.3 m (43.6 ft)
  5. Mapusaurus: 13 m (42.6 ft)
  6. Tyrannosaurus: 12.3 m (40.3 ft)
  7. Epanterias: 12.1 m (39.7 ft)
  8. Therizinosaurus: 12 m (39.3 ft)
  9. Edmarka: 12 m (39.3 ft)
  10. Carcharodontosaurus: 11.1-?13.5 m (37-?44 ft)
  11. Deinocheirus: 10-13 m (33-43 ft)

Most Massive Theropods

Size by overall weight of all theropods over 4 tons.

  1. Spinosaurus: 9-?12 tons
  2. Tyrannosaurus: 6.7-?8.9 tons
  3. Giganotosaurus: 4.16-?8 tons
  4. Therizinosaurus: 6.2 tons
  5. Tarbosaurus: 6 tons
  6. Epanterias: 4.5 tons
  7. Mapusaurus: 4-?5 tons
  8. Edmarka: 4 tons
  9. Carcharodontosaurus: 3-?4 tons
  10. Suchomimus: 2.9-4.8 tons

Smallest Theropods

A list of all theropods 1 meter or less in length.

  1. Epidendrosaurus: ~?15 cm (?6 in)
  2. Parvicursor: 55 cm (1.8 ft)
  3. Microraptor: 55-77 cm (1.8-2.5 ft)
  4. Ligabueino: 70 cm (2.3 ft)
  5. Nqwebasaurus: 80 cm (2.6 ft)
  6. Koparion: ?1 m (?3 ft)
  7. Compsognathus: 60 cm - 1.4 m (2 ft - 4.6 ft)
  8. Pedopenna: ?1 m (?3 ft)
  9. Caenagnathasia: 1 m (3 ft)
  10. Shuvuuia: 1 m (3 ft)
  11. Mononykus: 1 m (3 ft)
  12. Procompsognathus: 1 m (3 ft)

Sauropoda

Sauropod size is difficult to estimate given their usually fragmentary state of preservation. Sauropods are often preserved without their tails, so the margin of error in overall length estimates is high. Mass is calculated using the cube of the length, so for species in which the length is particularly uncertain, the weight is even more so. These size estimates are based primarily on surveys by Rymill (2001), Taylor (2003), and Mortimer (2004). Estimates that are particularly uncertain (due to very fragmentary or lost material) are preceded by a question mark.

Note that, generally, the giant sauropods can be divided into two categories - the shorter but stockier and more massive forms (mainly titanosaurs), and the longer but slenderer and more light-weight forms (mainly diplodocids).

Longest Sauropods

A list of sauropods that reached over 20 meters in length, including neck and tail.

  1. Amphicoelias: 40-?60 m (131-198 ft)
  2. Bruhathkayosaurus: ?28-?44 m (?92-?144 ft)
  3. Puertasaurus: 35-40 m (115-131 ft)
  4. Argentinosaurus: 30-37 m (98-123 ft)
  5. Turiasaurus: 30-37 m (98-121 ft)
  6. Supersaurus: 35 m (116 ft)
  7. Seismosaurus: 32 m (106 ft)
  8. Paralititan: 24-32 m (80-104 ft)
  9. Argyrosaurus: 18-?30 m (60-?98 ft)
  10. Sauroposeidon: 29 m (97 ft) Note: tallest known dinosaur, at 18m (58ft)
  11. Diplodocus: 25-27 m (83-88 ft)
  12. Barosaurus: 24-27 m (79-88 ft)
  13. Brachiosaurus: 25 m (83 ft)
  14. Pelorosaurus: 24 m (79 ft)
  15. Antarctosaurus: 19-23 m (63-76 ft)
  16. Apatosaurus: 22 m (73 ft)
  17. Haplocanthosaurus: 21.5 m (68 ft)

Most Massive Sauropods

Size by overall weight of all sauropods over 20 tons.

  1. Bruhathkayosaurus: ?157-?220 tons
  2. Amphicoelias: ?125-?170 tons
  3. Puertasaurus: 80-100 tons
  4. Argentinosaurus: 66-100 tons
  5. Paralititan: 65-80 tons
  6. Antarctosaurus: 69 tons
  7. Sauroposeidon: 50-60 tons
  8. Brachiosaurus: 30-60 tons
  9. Argyrosaurus: 45-55 tons
  10. Supersaurus: 40-50 tons
  11. Turiasaurus: 40-48 tons
  12. Seismosaurus: 35-45 tons
  13. Apatosaurus: 33-38 tons
  14. Diplodocus: 10-20 tons
  15. Barosaurus: 10-20 tons

Smallest Sauropods

A list of all sauropods measuring 10 meters or less in length.

  1. Anchisaurus: 2.4 m (7.8 ft)
  2. Ohmdenosaurus: 4 m (13 ft)
  3. Blikanasaurus: 5 m (16.4 ft)
  4. Magyarosaurus: 5.3 m (17 ft)
  5. Europasaurus: 6 m (19 ft)
  6. Vulcanodon: 6.5 m (21.3 ft)
  7. Isanosaurus: 7 m (23 ft)
  8. Camelotia: 9 m (29.5 ft)
  9. Tazoudasaurus: 9 m (29.5 ft)
  10. Antetonitrus: 8-10 m (26-30 ft), 1.5-2 m (5-6.5 ft) tall at hip
  11. Shunosaurus: 10 m (32 ft)
  12. Brachytrachelopan: 10 m (32 ft)
  13. Amazonsaurus: 10 m (32 ft), 10 tons

Ceratopsians

Longest Ceratopsians

Size by overall length, including tail, of all ceratopsians measuring 6 meters or more in length (size estimates from DinoData [3].

  1. Triceratops: 9 m (30ft)
  2. Arrhinoceratops: 9 m (30ft)
  3. Einiosaurus: 7.6 m (25.2 ft)
  4. Torosaurus: 7.5 m (25 ft)
  5. Pentaceratops: 7.5 m (25 ft)
  6. Pachyrhinosaurus: 6 m (20 ft)
  7. Achelousaurus: 6 m (20 ft)
  8. Centrosaurus: 6 m (20 ft)

Most Massive Ceratopsians

Size by overall weight.

Smallest Ceratopsians

A list of all ceratopsians 3 meters or less in length.

  1. Microceratops: 80 cm (2.6 ft)
  2. Bagaceratops: 1 m (3 ft 4 in).
  3. Avaceratops: 2 m (7 feet) [4]
  4. Leptoceratops: 2.4 m (8 ft)

Thyreophorans

Largest Thyreophorans

  1. Ankylosaurus: 7.5-10.7 m (25-35 feet) long [5]
  2. Tarchia: 8.0-8.5 m (26-28 ft) long.
  3. Edmontonia: 7 m (23 ft) long
  4. Panoplosaurus: 5.5-7 m (18-23 ft) long.
  5. Euoplocephalus: 6 m (20 ft) long.

Smallest Thyreophorans

  1. Liaoningosaurus: ?34 cm (?1 ft)
  2. Scutellosaurus: 1.5 m long[6]
  3. Struthiosaurus: 2-2.5 m (6 ft 8 in to 8 ft 4 in) long.

Pachycephalosaurs

Largest Pachycephalosaurs

  1. Pachycephalosaurus: 4.6 m (15 feet) long [7]

Smallest Pachycephalosaurs

  1. Micropachycephalosaurus: 60 cm (2 ft) long.
  2. Wannanosaurus: 60 cm (2 ft) long.
  3. Yaverlandia: 1 m (3 ft 4 in) long.

References

  • dal Sasso, C., S. Maganuco, E. Buffetaut and M. A. Mendez (2006). "New information on the skull of the enigmatic theropod Spinosaurus, with remarks on its sizes and affinities.". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 25(4): 888-896.
  • Paul, Gregory S. (1997). "Dinosaur models: the good, the bad, and using them to estimate the mass of dinosaurs". Dinofest International 1997: 129-154.

External links


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